Google Study Reveals Many People Are Still Using Breached Passwords

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Recently, a Google study showed that about 316,000 passwords have already been breached and are still in use. These used password credentials also include financial and governmental accounts. The information used to create this study was from Google Chrome’s Password Checkup extension. Google recently stated on their blog, “The study illustrates how secure, democratized access to password breach alerting can help mitigate one dimension of account hijacking.”

The Password Checkup Extension activates when someone signs into a site, which uses one out of 4 billion username/passwords that Google finds unsafe due to a third-party breach. Google found out that out of 21 million passwords and usernames, 1.5% of these sign-ins were risky. They also stated that many people like to reuse passwords that tend to be vulnerable, which puts them at risk. People use vulnerable passwords when it comes to entertainment and news websites, and sometimes on shopping sites where there could be credit card information stored. About 26 percent of unsafe passwords were reset by users. In addition to that, 60 percent of those new passwords are secured, leaving out the possibility of guessing attacks, which would take a hacker over a hundred million guesses before figuring out the user’s new password. 

Not changing used passwords can lead to cybercriminals gaining unauthorized account access. There have been “credential-stuffing incidents”, which affected companies like Dunkin Donuts and State Farm. Hackers would use lists of breached usernames and passwords to log in to web application accounts through automated requests. When the right username and password combination are found, cybercriminals can gain access to the targeted account. 

Google recommends using their Password Checkup Extension as a precautionary measure to alert users of whether their password has been breached. It is good practice to use different passwords for all your accounts and store them in a secure password manager application. As always, avoid using simple-to-guess passwords and instead use phrases with numbers and symbols. 

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