How to Check If Your Facebook Data Has Been Breached

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Facebook faced immense backlash as the company announced 30 million personal accounts had been compromised in its most recent data breach back in September. Users’ contact and address information were all accessed during the breach, along with other sensitive data such as a user’s 15 most recent searches.

Facebook’s Help Center can assist users in figuring out if their account was hit by the breach.

Use these steps to find out how:

  1. On the top right corner of your Facebook account, click on the “?” icon to access  Help Center. You can also click the link below:

https://www.facebook.com/help/securitynotice?ref=sec

  1. Search “security incident” in the search box above.
  2. Scroll down to the bottom of the page to see the section marked: “Is my Facebook account impacted by this security issue?”
  3. This section will provide a “yes” or “no” answer to its users. The message will also show up on users’ news feeds.

  1. If No, there is no action needed to be taken at this time.
  2. If Yes, you will be in one of these categories:
  • You’re one of the 15 million users’ whose name and phone/email has been stolen.
  • You’re one of the 14 million users’ whose account got breached with getting access to your “username, gender, locale/language, relationship status, religion, hometown, self-reported current city, birthdate, device types used to access Facebook, education, work, the last 10 places you’ve checked into or were tagged in, website, people or Pages you follow, and the 15 most recent searches.”
  • You’re in the 1 million users whose access token got stolen, but luckily no information has been breached. 

If your data was accessed from this breach, there is no need to change your password or credit card information at this time. Furthermore, keep an eye out for scam calls and spam emails that ask for your personal information such as the login credentials for signing into your accounts. If you were in the 14 million within Group B, it’s best to call your bank or phone carrier to input a pin code to prevent hackers from essentially pretending to be you in order to access your accounts.

After such a massive data breach, should we really trust Facebook as a safe space to continue sharing with our loved ones?

 

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